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Want to sell courses online? Here’s how to start

The future of learning is in digital courses. More and more individuals, schools, businesses, and organizations are purchasing online courses on everything from management skills to personal fitness. If you’re an expert in your field, you can make money selling training courses online to interested students. All you need is a little bit of information on creating the right content, putting it in the proper format, and making sure that it’s compatible with today’s standards for web-based learning technology.

7 tips for creating an online course

Creating courses online involves getting subject matter expertise into a course that takes learners on a logical and well-organised journey from ignorance to knowledge. That is a fundamental requirement for an online course to have any impact at all. But what about the delivery system – how do you package the learning content as a product that reaches learners?

How to spot deepfakes: Reuters and Facebook release course

Deepfakes and other manipulated media are now easy to make. The tools are freely available and the results can be convincing. It is now possible to put one public figure’s words in the mouth of another by superimposing and lip-syncing the latter’s face. It is also possible to have anybody appear to say things that nobody ever said in reality except the faker. The technology is now mature enough to fool the casual viewer. And since the media are consumed almost entirely by casual viewers, deepfakes are a new and pernicious danger to the public’s perceptions of reality.

An insider view of xAPI adoption figures from Rustici

Just after our recent post about (s)low xAPI adoption in the L&D community, Rustici Software have published some behind-the-scenes figures on xAPI use in their own eLearning content delivery and testing service, SCORM Cloud. The fact that SCORM Cloud offers a built-in LRS (Learning Record Store) might be skewing the figures somewhat since it offers a turnkey LRS solution in an L&D world that hasn’t yet really joined up the xAPI/LRS implementation dots yet.

Some causes of slow xAPI adoption

Back in 2015 we published an article on elearningindustry.com about Rustici Software’s Experience API, aka xAPI, aka Tin Can API. It was one of many such articles in the wake of xAPI’s launch in 2013, and gave an explanation of how this new learning data tool worked and the great variety of systems it could theoretically gather and aggregate learning data from.