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Gongbang: your virtual study buddy

South Koreans are orderly. They obey laws, offer things with both hands, avoid eye contact, work hard, believe the number 4 is unlucky, and have small dogs. That is a fairly typical collection of national characteristics, in the same way that the British are obsessed with class, drink too much tea and alcohol, and say ‘sorry’ all the time. But the Korean approach to internet culture is fast becoming a new national characteristic. They have one of the world’s fastest broadband infrastructures, which makes online life pretty zippy.

Spreading kindness in online learning environments

Wednesday this week is World Kindness Day, bringing a swathe of global initiatives and events aimed at promoting being nice to each other. People worldwide will be encouraged to go out and do something they wouldn’t usually do that will benefit somebody else, directly or indirectly.

Recover from burnout with these online courses

The World Health Organization recently added workplace burnout to its International Classification of Diseases as an occupational phenomenon. It isn’t classed as a disease but a ‘factor influencing health status’.   

It is no surprise that if the place where you spend most of your waking life is getting you down, then you are not going to be the happiest bunny on the block and eventually something will have to give. The WHO define burnout as follows:

Cleanse THIS! Healthy eating straight from the horse’s mouth

When it comes to eating healthily, would you take advice from a celebrity or a world-famous medical school? (Hint: would you take financial advice from a random person in the street or from Warren Buffett?)

Chlorella algae and activated charcoal smoothies. That’s one example of substances that lifestyle gurus will suggest you ingest to ‘cleanse’ the body of ‘toxins’. And we won’t even go into what they often suggest you put in your other end to – guess what – cleanse the body of toxins. Because ... ew.

Don’t just do something, stand there – mindfulness at work

“I don’t have time for mindfulness and meditation!” says everyone with a job ever. “I’ve got too much to do!”

This is ironic. A mindful mind is more alert, efficient and productive than a non-mindful one, and this creates more ... guess what ... time in which to get things done. Plus an uncluttered mind doesn’t get stressed, feels better, listens better, and does better.