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The gamification of medicine - and why it's a good thing

There was an old kids’ game in the 1980s called Operation in which players used tweezers to attempt to extract bones and other bits and pieces from a hapless patient called Cavity Sam. If their hand wasn’t steady enough, the patient’s nose lit up red and a buzzer sounded. Oh no! Ha ha, start again.

The game drew on the drama and tension of real-life surgery, and it would be interesting to find out how many kids who later became surgeons remember playing this game. Maybe it was what first inspired some to become doctors.

Cannabis industry education is booming

In recent years a series of legal dominoes have toppled in the United States surrounding the supply and consumption of a well-known herb with serrated leaves. In 2016 alone Nevada, Maine and Massachusetts legalized recreational cannabis, joining other legalized states like Oregon, Colorado, Alaska and, most recently, California. As the dominoes topple, an industry is being created that has already netted billions of dollars, not only in the supply of cannabis as a commodity but also in the education sector.

Medical Billing: cracking the code

People will always need medical care, so any job associated with the medical profession is a long-term winning proposition. And doctors like getting paid, so they need people to sort out their billing for them. Medical billing in the United States is a professional job involving medical jargon and a complex system of codes and insurance terms. People familiar with this environment are in high demand and will continue to be for the foreseeable future.

Scottish universities widen medical school access to poorer students

Medicine is a highly competitive course to get into at university, but traditionally students from Scotland’s poorest neighbourhoods have not attempted to enter the meritocracy that medical school admissions should be. It does cost a lot of money to put yourself through medical school, but grants, loans and other financial assistance are available. An initiative by Universities Scotland aims to raise awareness of the possibilities open to applicants from poorer backgrounds.

What makes people happy?

In 2014 The University of Berkeley launched a MOOC called The Science of Happiness. It is still going strong in 2016 because people are, well, happy with it.