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Where is my mind? - visual psychology 101

So, what’s up with the blob of jelly inside our skulls? How does it work, and why does it make us do what we do? Answering these questions is the domain of psychology. There are plenty of introductions to psychology out there, but there’s a new one from a top Yale professor that delivers the ideas in a memorable way.

Close encounters of the furred kind: careers with animals

Working with animals. What images do those words conjure up? Veterinary nurse or surgeon? Animal shelter worker? Professional dog walker?

Those are undeniably jobs that involve animals, but the picture is so much bigger than that. How about Police Dog Handler? Animal Welfare Charity Inspector? Zoologist? Wildlife Documentary Maker? Forestry Worker? Beekeeper?

Penguinologist? A viable career option according to reed.co.uk.

Can we stop hurricanes?

The 2017 hurricane season has been one of the most violent on record, with the highest number of major hurricanes since 2005 and it’s not even over yet. The storms have marched across the Atlantic in seemingly endless succession, and the alphabetic-order names have kept coming: Gert, Harvey, Irma, José, Katia, Lee, Maria, Nate, Ophelia … let’s hope at the time of writing that there isn’t a Philippe.

Learn from the best: National Geographic photography course

There is arguably no greater repository of outstanding nature and adventure photography than the archives of the National Geographic. The magazine has produced some of the most famous photographs of all time, from Steve McCurry’s Afghan Girl to Tim Laman’s Orangutan reaching for figs at the top of a 100 foot tree in Borneo, and many more. Camera manufacturers pay top dollar to have their ads on the back page of NG, because they know the numbers of avid photographers who read the magazine and aspire to produce something approaching the marvels to be found within its covers.

Predicting the unpredictable: understanding the weather

It’s very British to talk about the weather. So it’s fitting that a British university – the University of Reading – offers a 3-week course called Come Rain or Shine: Understanding The Weather. Taking this course will have the effect of turning comments like ‘Looks like rain tomorrow’ into more technical and perhaps even accurate predictions. Cows lying down might mean it’s going to rain, but for the curious who want to know why it’s going to rain, this course is perfect.