Skip to main content

EcoGastronomy: stuff your face, not the planet

Increasingly, we can’t just enjoy food any more without considering its effect on the environment. Tucking into a juicy steak is, for growing numbers of people, no longer simply an exercise in indulgence devoid of concern for the meat’s provenance, whether it was relatively happy and humanely slaughtered, and how much methane it farted out when it was alive.

The million-dollar course about zombies

What could be worse than a scenario in which your own family turns into walking corpses who try to eat your brain? Well, nothing really – which is why the zombie apocalypse is so often used as a metaphor for any type of major global catastrophe, especially in the context of disaster preparedness. As the nec plus ultra of bad situations, its tongue-in-cheek use infers that if you can survive that, you can survive anything.

How to teach a child to swim

Drowning is the leading cause of death for kids under the age of five, and a quarter of the US population of adults can’t swim. We asked Coach Brian Quinn from Swim Lesson Club USA to explain how to speed up the swimming lesson process. Here's what he has to say.

 

2 main roadblocks for learning how to swim are sensitivity to water on the face and the feeling of buoyancy. Sensory sensitivity is the fundamental reason why it is difficult to learn to swim.

Recover from burnout with these online courses

The World Health Organization recently added workplace burnout to its International Classification of Diseases as an occupational phenomenon. It isn’t classed as a disease but a ‘factor influencing health status’.   

It is no surprise that if the place where you spend most of your waking life is getting you down, then you are not going to be the happiest bunny on the block and eventually something will have to give. The WHO define burnout as follows: