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Training the next generation of cybersecurity experts

England’s Bletchley Park, famous for its World War II codebreaking success, is about to put on display some of the actual Nazi messages it decrypted. Bletchley’s National Museum of Computing houses a working replica of the five-tonne ‘Colussus’ decryption engine, of which 10 were in use at the peak of the wartime codebreaking effort. The ‘original and freshly discovered’ messages will be available for visitors to marvel at.

Soft skills for hard business – the kernel of success

What skills do employers value most? The ones that fill a hot current skills gap, like blockchain or cybersecurity? Sure, you can snap up a job right now in one of those areas if you’re skilled up, and probably a well-paid one too. But if you start out now on the learning path hoping for a slice of the action, maybe by the time you’ve acquired the skills – which could take years – the market might be flooded with prospectors who’ve had the same idea and the opportunity could have flown the roost.

Hot skill: Augmented Reality Development

Put the headset away. Everybody has got to stop confusing AR and VR. This article is about AR (Augmented Reality), not about people stumbling into things while locked away inside a virtual world via their sci-fi goggles.

Starving IT researcher? Sniff out bugs for cash

The first ever bug bounty program was launched in 1983. The prize for finding a bug in the software? A Volkswagen Beetle (a bug – geddit?). Such is the pressure on software firms to produce vulnerability-free code that they will offer cash rewards to white hat security researchers who can find and report flaws. Bug-hunting has become an industry, and anyone with the right smarts can try for a slice of the bug bounty pie.

Stamping out fake degrees: the Disciplina blockchain

In August last year courseindex.com published an article about how blockchain technology might be used to prevent the falsification of academic records. Development of such a blockchain was being developed by Sony and IBM in collaboration at the time. A shocking statistic quoted in the article was that 21% of U.S. job applicants’ resumes stated fraudulent degrees.

Executive education for digital disruption

The Institute for Digital Business Strategy is a new online school with the aim of helping executives in Africa and other continents to manage the process of realigning their strategies in the face of digital disruption.