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Bringing Formula 1 thinking to the corporate boardroom

The relentless pace of Formula 1 innovation is legendary. Performance on track depends on the constant examination and improvement of every aspect of a complex machine and its track team in order to gain a small but significant edge on rivals, who are themselves all striving in the same way. Competition is so fierce in F1 that the sport’s HQ have launched a series of management events aimed at bringing some of that constant innovation thinking into the business world.

Executive education for digital disruption

The Institute for Digital Business Strategy is a new online school with the aim of helping executives in Africa and other continents to manage the process of realigning their strategies in the face of digital disruption.

Forbes launches new eLearning platform

Forbes is angling for a bite of the Continuing Professional Education market with learn.forbes.com, its new eLearning platform launched June 6. Aspiring professionals, the bedrock of Forbes’ readership, can now choose from 60-plus self-paced online courses focused on leadership, entrepreneurship, business, IT, sales and cybersecurity.

Smart.ly: pocket-sized MBA divides opinion

What is the real value of an MBA? The skills developed, or the prestige of the issuing institution? For those seeking to add an MBA to their resume, their answer to that question will make the difference between spending thousands of dollars and spending no dollars at all.

Acing the quality game: Lean Six Sigma

In manufacturing, one measure of the efficiency and quality of a process is its sigma rating – which can refer either to yield or the percentage of defect-free products it creates. The number in front of the sigma symbol (σ) indicates where the process’s output lies on the bell curve of standard deviation. 1σ is terrible, with 69% of products coming off the production line with defects – a massive waste of resources. 2σ would see around a 31% defect rate. 3σ would be about 7%.

Business risk, or How To Train Your Dragon

Business is all about calculated risk. The key word there is ‘calculated’. In order for a business to prosper in the long term, it needs to identify, quantify and manage the risks it faces. In the mind of the astute businessperson ‘What could possibly go wrong?’ is not a rhetorical question. If it IS used as a rhetorical question, it often heralds disaster in the same way as the words ’Here, hold my beer!’ often herald some kind of pratfall that delights YouTube viewers.