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A drone is not just for Christmas: UAV pilot courses

Drones come in different types and sizes. Anyone can buy a small one and fly it around their garden for fun. But to fly a commercial drone – bigger versions that fly faster, higher and longer and carry high-resolution video cameras – you’ll need a licence. They are, after all, small aircraft and can cause damage or injure people and animals when they crash, not to mention the dangers of invading the flight paths of passenger jets at take-off and landing. You need to know where and when you are allowed to fly a commercial drone to avoid trouble with the law.

The classroom of the future is already here (for some)

80 students from all around the globe are displayed on a curved screen measuring 45 square metres. The lecturer is a hologram moved around the lecture hall by a robot. The students collaborate on documents and take part in simulations in real time. The professor uses artificial intelligence and big data to run simulations that test the students’ abilities. He or she has a rolling live feed of data on students’ participation, including their emotional engagement. There is no back row of seats where students can hide. Everybody sits front and centre on the giant screen.

Hogwarts for hackers: new Bletchley cyber security college to open in 2018

Bletchley Park, a suburb of Milton Keynes in England, was central to World War Two intelligence efforts. Scientists including Alan Turing designed the first ever electric programmable computer there (Colossus) and used it to crack the Nazi’s Enigma Code. Bletchley Park is synonymous with British codebreaking and also now houses the National Museum of Computing.

The university without any teachers

There are hotels in Europe without any staff. You drive up and check in via a machine that issues your room key, the door unlocks and you go up to your room. Then you eat from vending machines, stay the night and check out, all without any human contact.

This concept has now been brought to classroom education. There’s a coding school – started in Europe, just like the hotels – that offers programming courses without any teachers, and does not issue any diploma or degree qualifications. It’s open 24/7, and it’s very popular.

The digital natives are restless: Geek camp for kids

When you see a child’s eyes light up at the sight of a Star Wars lightsaber, an Arduino kit or a LEGO Technic set, there’s really only one thing to do: sign them up for out-of-school geek classes. They will find themselves in their element, surrounded either physically or virtually by like-minded kids with a burning passion for technology. This welcoming environment might do something for their social skills, too, if they are lagging a bit behind their technical skills.